SAFETY EDUCATION SUCCESSES

 

Picture6“SAFETY EDUCATION SUCCESSES.”By Terence Morris, FOUNDER, PACE TULSA AGS FOUNDATION.  May 9, 2017 12:33 PM. Join PACE TULSA NOW TEXT:  PACEPAC  TO:  22828Register |  Lost your password?.  feed-icon-28x28

“In 2015, there were 590 vehicle collisions involving fatalities in the State of Oklahoma, in which 643 persons lost their lives, compared to 669 fatalities from 589 fatal crashes in 2014. While these numbers represent an improvement in lives lost from 2014, they still represent a needless loss of life. Even more significant is the fact that of those 669 deaths, 170 resulted from crashes involving a driver having a blood alcohol level of .08 or more, an increase from 152 in 2014.[1] We must continue our efforts to better identify the causation factors and remove impaired drivers from our roadways. In response to such need, the Governor’s Impaired Driving Prevention Advisory Council was created in 2013. This council is charged with making recommendations to the Governor’s office on ways to better combat the impaired driving problem. We have also increased our outreach to Native American, tribal communities, hosting a breakout session specific to tribal efforts in impaired driving at the annual OHSO Highway Safety Forum and participation in the annual TTAP Conference. The increase in the observed statewide seat belt use rate from 83.6% in 2013 to 86.3% in 2014 did not continue into 2015, with the 2015 survey reflecting a use rate of 84.4%3 . The good news is that the 2016 survey again reflected an increase to 86.6%, representing the highest use rate since the passage of the primary seat belt law in 1997; however, the Oklahoma rate is still less than the national rate of 90.3%. The northeast section of the state had the highest average seat belt us rate at 87.8%, while the southeast part of the 1 Oklahoma Crash Facts 2015 2 NHTSA Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) 2015 3 Oklahoma Seat Belt Observation Study Summer 2016.” Governor’s Oklahoma Highway Safety Office 2016.[1]

[1] FATALITIES AND SERIOUS INJURIES (RESTRAINED)

[2] UNRESTRAINED FATALITIES AND OPERATOR .08 OR MORE BAC FATALITIES.  That means that PACE TULSA AGS FOUNDATION efforts to expand Pedestrian Awareness Crosswalk Education in Public Transportation Policy are supported by statistical models that are working.

FATALITIES AND SERIOUS INJURIES

C-1 Number of Fatalities (FARS) Target: To limit the projected increase in the number of traffic fatalities from 678 in 2013 to 694 in 2016. Oklahoma met its 2015 target to limit an expected increase in fatalities to no more than 712 in 2015, with 643 fatalities reported. While CY2016 results are not yet available, preliminary data to date indicates that fatalities in 2016 may remain fairly consistent with the 2015 results. The northeast section of the state had the highest average seat belt us rate at 87.8%

C-2 Number of Serious Injuries (State Data) Target: To limit the projected increase in the number of Serious Injuries in MVC from 14,734 in 2013 to 15,791 in 2016. Oklahoma met this target in CY2015, not only limiting but seeing a decrease in serious injuries from 14,732 to 14,266. Preliminary data for CY2016 is not available at this time. However, over the last five years, the number of serious injuries (incapacitating and non-incapacitating) has shown a downward trend, from a high of 16,190 in 2011 to 14,266 in 2015 (Oklahoma data).[1]

NHTSA Core Outcome (C) and Behavior (B) Performance MeasuresPicture7

Oklahoma met and greatly exceeded the 2014 target, reducing the number of VMT fatalities from 1.41in 2014 to 1.35 154 in 2014 – a +%25 decrease.

C-3 Fatality Rates for Vehicle Miles Traveled (FARS) Target C-3: To limit the projected increase in the Fatalities per 100 Million VMT rate from 1.41 in 2013 to 1.45 in 2016.

C-4 Unrestrained Fatalities, all seating positions (FARS).  Target:  To reduce the number of unrestrained occupant fatalities (all seating positions) from 282 in 2012 to 265 in 2015.  Oklahoma met its 2014 target goal, with the number of unrestrained fatalities down from 287 in 2011 to 258 in 2014.  The 2015 statewide belt use survey indicated a drop in seat belt use rate from 2014 to 2015.  Preliminary data reflects that the numbers for unbelted fatalities in 2015 will remain flat or possibly increase by a small amount at or near the 2015 target.[1]

NHTSA Core Outcome (C) and Behavior (B) Performance MeasuresPicture8

TAKE A LOOK AT THESE NUMBERS THAT ARE BEING REPORTED BY THE OKLAHOMA HIGHWAY SAFETY OFFICE FY2016 ANNUAL REPORT.

Additionally, we feel that since the outcomes of this report are so promising that our 6 month study, An Examination: Intersection Awareness 31st & Harvard to 41st & Yale, would mean further validation of these kind of foundation programs.

Oklahoma met and greatly exceeded the 2014 target, reducing the number of .08 impaired fatalities from 220 in 2011 to 154 in 2014 – a %25 decrease.  We feel this decrease is not simply a short term trend, but is indicative of positive improvement directly resulting from the countermeasures employed by pedestrian safety officials.  (Due to the difficulty in obtaining all necessary data needed for evaluation of this measure in a timely manner, no estimate as to what the 2015 results may reflect is deemed reliable at this time.)

NHTSA Core Outcome (C) and Behavior (B) Performance MeasuresPicture9

C-5 Number of Fatalities, operator .08 or more BAC (FARS).  Target:  To limit the projected increase in the number of fatalities involving drivers or motorcycle operators with .08+ BAC from 205 in 2012 to 240 in 2015. [1]

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REFERENCES:

[1] Oklahoma Crash Facts 2015

[2] NHTSA Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) 2015

[3] Oklahoma Seat Belt Observation Study Summer 2016

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COPYRIGHT | 2017 ©PACE AGS FOUNDATION. “Pedestrian Awareness Crosswalk Education is an online think-tank intersecting awareness of public transportation policy in the United States.”

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